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FMUK Article




BaxterStorey recognised in Birmingham City University People Awards

BaxterStorey recognised in Birmingham City University People Awards

BaxterStorey is delighted to announce that employee Marianne Philippou (General Manager at Birmingham City University’s Royal Birmingham Conservatoire) was awarded winner of the Enterprise Individual Award at the University’s first annual CFO People Portfolio Awards earlier this month.
The Awards were introduced by Birmingham City University Chief Finance Officer, David Wilkins, with the aim of recognising the exceptional contribution that the University’s staff make within the organisation.
BaxterStorey Hospitality Manager, Adam Warden, was also nominated for the Enterprise Individual Award and the BaxterStorey catering team was nominated for the Student Transformation Team.
Food at the event was catered for by the fabulous catering team, with over 150 guests enjoying a festival of street food inspired dishes from braised aubergine curry, edamame bean and quinoa salad, chilli and mint chicken skewers and more.
Commenting on her award, Marianne said: “I’m thrilled to have received the Enterprise Individual Award.
It’s great to work in such a rewarding environment, where students and colleagues appreciate every bit that we do at the University’s Royal Conservatoire.
I couldn’t have achieved this without my incredible team who are always amazing me with their skills and resourcefulness, I’m very proud of us all”.
Jane Grimmett, Assistant Director of Estates and Facilities at Birmingham City University said: “The Awards are a fantastic initiative and way for us to celebrate the great work being achieved within the organisation.
Considering this is our inaugural year, the volume and calibre of finalists has been outstanding.
Marianne and all of our winners are examples of the dedication from our partners to give our students and guests the best experience at the University”.


 
Second Helpings: The second edition of the CIC BIM Protocol

Second Helpings: The second edition of the CIC BIM Protocol

By Simon Lewis, Partner, and Vicky McCombe, Managing Associate at law firm Womble Bond Dickinson
The second edition of the CIC BIM protocol was published on 10 April 2018. It is intended to reflect current practices and standards and to be a more flexible document to use alongside different contractual arrangements. It will fit more easily with the other documents in the contractual matrix and shows a greater understanding of the need to integrate the legal and technical aspects of BIM, an issue which needs to be addressed to ensure that BIM projects have a clear and well defined delivery mechanism. As such it marks a significant development on the first edition and will certainly contribute towards the growing standardisation of BIM legal and contractual documentation, which is to be welcomed.
The first edition of the protocol stated that it took precedence over any other documents in the Agreement. This has now been amended so that it only takes precedence if there is a conflict in relation to specific clauses and appendices (clauses 3 and 4 and Appendices 1 and 2) and if the Agreement doesn’t include provisions stating how conflicts or inconsistencies should be resolved. This is appropriate in the context of the relevant provisions which deal with obligations on the Employer and the Project Team Member to assist with a smooth BIM process. Technical teams will need to check this suits their requirements and Project Team Members should consider whether they need to include or remove anything else from the Employer’s Requirements, consultants’ services and so on. Any priority clause in the underlying contractual documents will need to reflect this position, which is acknowledged in the guidance notes. Note however that this applies except where the protocol states otherwise so if you do not want this to be the case you would need some clear wording (or an amendment to the protocol) to deal with this.
The intellectual property provisions was an area which needed to be improved and has been. The licence granted is no longer revocable on the payment of fees and there is an acknowledgement that the Agreement may deal with intellectual property (which most do) as certain provisions only apply if the Agreement contains no provisions regarding intellectual property. This helps with concerns over inconsistencies although consideration will need to be given as to what to do in the event that any Agreement does contain intellectual property provisions but they do not deal with BIM. Also the intellectual property provisions where the Employer grants a licence to the Project Team Members apply even if the Agreement contains intellectual property provisions so these will still need to be deleted if the Agreement already deals with this. Alternatively, such provisions could be removed from the underlying Agreement and the parties can instead rely on those in the protocol.
Notably, the second edition still doesn’t deal with ownership of the federated model (now the Federated Information Model).
The first edition potentially undermined the BIM model by specifying that Project Team Members did not warrant the integrity of the electronic data. This has now been clarified and significantly watered down so now the Project Team Member gives no warranty that software it is using is compatible with that of any other Project Team Member. It may have been that this was the intention behind the original drafting so this is welcome clarity. Given that the software to be used is usually specified (or should be) hopefully this will not be an issue.
The second edition reflects developments in the publication of Publicly Available Standards (PASs) since the issuing of the first protocol back in 2013. Significant changes in the second edition, highlighted in the guidance notes, point to the changes in terminology that the current revision to PAS1192-2 is undergoing. The shifting of attention from models to information is welcome since it has always been the case that the central component of BIM is the efficient use of information. This is also reflected in changes in definitions such as the change from “Model” to “Information Model” and the more expansive and helpful definition of “Information Model”.
Another very welcome introduction is the integration into the second edition of the provisions of PAS1192-5. This is the PAS dealing with cyber security which actually applies to more than just BIM: it also encompasses the development of what is termed a security-minded approach to the increasing digitisation of information about our infrastructure. Whilst this will not be required on every project, bringing this into the protocol should make the parties think about whether they should be examining the project or adjacent properties to consider whether they are sensitive assets that would raise security issues. If such issues are raised and therefore there is a need to use Appendix 3 of the protocol consideration will have to be given to further amending the Agreement to align properly with the related termination clauses outlined in the protocol.
Another helpful new provision is the inclusion of obligations on the Project Team Member to attend meetings in relation to the co-ordination of project information and ambiguity, conflict or inconsistency in or between any project information. Again, helpfully the protocol states that in this respect the parties shall comply with any applicable provisions in the Agreement and sets out what to do in the absence of such provisions so as to avoid conflicts. Most Agreements will go further than the BIM protocol by looking at time and money implications and it is an issue for the parties and the approach they are taking to the project to consider whether reflecting the approach taken in most standard form contracts is always appropriate when looking at what is meant to be a collaborative process.
An interesting addition which is not specifically highlighted in the guidance notes is the insertion of references to the Asset Information Model. This is slightly puzzling and perhaps could do with some further clarification. The Asset Information Model (AIM) is to be found in PAS1192-3, which deals with the use of BIM in the context of the operational phase of assets. As such, the AIM is different in many ways to the model that is referred to in PAS1192-2 for the development and new build phase (currently referred to as the Project Information Model (PIM)) . The reference to the AIM in the second edition occurs in clause 4.1.5, where it is an obligation of the Project Team Member to provide “such information and assistance as specified in the Information Particulars in connection with any Asset Information Models at such times as required in the Information Particulars”. In the definitions section, the AIM is defined as “a maintained Information Model used to manage, maintain and operate the asset”. There is also a reference to it in Appendix 2 (Information Particulars) as the “information and assistance required in respect of the Asset Information Model” with a cross reference to clause 4.1.5.
The issue is that the PIM and the AIM are in fact different things operating in the different contexts of PAS 1192-2 and PAS 1192-3. The incorporation of references to the AIM is however not fully worked through in the protocol, which may cause some confusion in that the AIM needs to be set within the PAS 1192-3 framework in order to allow it to function properly in the protocol. Maybe an exercise that the drafters of the protocol should now undertake is to produce another version (version 2.5?) which deals specifically with operational arrangements and adopts the provisions of PAS 1192-3 more wholeheartedly. This is something we shall examine in more detail in a subsequent article.
These issues aside, the second edition of the protocol is a welcome development, providing a more flexible and integrated contractual structure governing the use of BIM on projects. It updates the first edition to take account of developments since 2013 and looks forward to the development of the widespread use of BIM at Level 2 throughout the construction sector. Allied with the recent publication of the Winfield Rock Report dealing with the legal and contractual issues arising from BIM, this should provide a firm foundation for the contractual underpinning of BIM project documentation going forward.


 
Office furniture: from second hand to first choice

Office furniture: from second hand to first choice

Recycling is frequently thrust upon us as the default option for all purchasing. It can generate a sense of guilt in anyone who even dares to purchase a new product; to mark them out as betraying the earth. Grim pictures of landfill sites and fly-tipping stacked with old tables and chairs are intended to persuade us of the significant virtues of re-using, re-purposing or just not throwing things away until they fall part. within this drive to have us think green, however is there actually an argument that considers the benefits case for purchasing recycled products.
Office furniture is a case in point. Let’s start by slaying some of the recycling myths. Old concepts of second hand furniture are obsolete. That means furniture that is stained, scratched and largely looking tired are concepts we need to consign to the past. The market for recycled office furniture is not full of businesses prepared to compromise on quality; rather they are looking for lower costs. In fact, it is difficult to see exactly what the concession is here given that the customer demands are as high for second hand furniture as they are for new.
The second myth is that you must be prepared for your office to be a myriad of colours and styles because there is no way that any supplier could fit out a whole room, let alone a business with matched furniture. Whilst companies in this sector can supply products individually they also hold stocks of up to 100 pieces per set. There is no need to fear your clients will believe they are entering a garage sale when they visit because the options for furniture supply are the same regardless of whether you buy new or not.
The last of those common myths is that the leading brands will not be available and, if they are, they will be near end of life. The truth is that there is very little demand for the battered items of this myth but a requirement that stock includes the best brands that clients have come to trust. To meet this need means to offer a full range of options. In keeping with new furniture, they will be no less maintained or in a poor state of repair. This is simply high quality office furniture, pre-owned.
Myths put to bed, though are there any reasons why second hand should be first choice. Ross Dutton from 2NDHND says there are: ‘Cost is key. Recycled furniture is cheaper and often at staggeringly reduced prices which should keep the finance team happy and support your bottom line. Reductions in cost compared with new can run as high as 75% but with no compromise on quality. We bundle this with 12 month warranties on many of our items. That makes the point that sellers have great confidence in the quality of what they can offer’. Roll out 75% reductions across all your office furniture needs and suddenly a complete refresh of your current office looks financially viable. You can pass on your current furniture to a charity knowing that you are not contributing to the growing waste mountains. In fact, you are preventing them.
The green cause is a worthy one, however, as Ross points out. ‘Aside from meeting your own eco-goals for the business it is a substantive contribution to reducing our collective carbon footprint’. Wrap, a charity working for the sustainable use of resources, emphasised this point reporting that providing 1 tonne of desks to a reuse network can result in a net greenhouse gas emission saving of 0.2 tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent compared to landfill. They go on to state that businesses are estimated to spend £9 million per annum disposing of desks to landfill in the UK alone so buying recycled and reconditioned office furniture means both an emissions and financial saving.
The question stands, then as to why recycled office furniture would not be your first choice. Second hand does not mean a compromise in quality but it just might mean a reduction in spend and carbon impact.


 
The Latest Academy Ambassador Sees Distribution As Key

The Latest Academy Ambassador Sees Distribution As Key

NET LED Lighting are acknowledged specialists in LED lighting solutions for commercial businesses across the UK via its extensive electrical wholesaler network.
Seen as the manufacturers’ distributor, with over 25 years of knowledge and experience in SMD LED technologies, NET LED ensures they only supply products that meet the industry’s stringent quality and performance demands.
Christopher Dawes, Director at NET LED explains why they wanted to become an Ambassador of the Lighting Industry Academy.
“At NET LED we are very keen to set and raise standards for people looking for a career in our industry and have experienced first-hand the benefits of enrolling team members onto Academy courses.”
NET LED are a recognised LIAQA Assured Company for lamps and Commercial Luminaires and their supply chain and processes are accredited to ISO 9001 and 14001 ensuring the highest standards for quality and environmental management.
They are also a member of ICEL, the Industry Committee for Emergency Lighting, whose mission is to strengthen the industry and promote the benefits of good quality lighting.
With such respected credentials as these, the Academy are proud to welcome NET LED to the family.
NET LED’s commitment as an Ambassador, reinforces the vision and direction the Academy will take by helping it reach its full potential, support its goals and promote education and skills across the lighting community.
The Academy with NET LED’s support will bring skills and learning to the whole community, and create opportunities to develop the lighting community for a bright and exciting future.


 
Apleona secures new UK FM deal with leading global automotive industry supplier

Apleona secures new UK FM deal with leading global automotive industry supplier

Apleona HSG Facility Management UK has secured a new deal with one of the world’s largest automotive suppliers, safeguarding UK jobs in the process.
The three-year deal, valued in excess of £2million, sees Apleona provide services including M&E, fabric, cleaning, waste management, postal services, porterage, pest control and project management at ZF’s Solihull campus, which also includes offices, laboratories and test areas.
This contract win will see 26 employees join Apleona from the former service provider. Additionally, the existing supply chain will be retained by Apleona going forwards, helping to secure further jobs potentially at risk.
ZF is a global leader in driveline and chassis technology, as well as active and passive safety technology. The company has a global workforce of around 146,000, with approximately 230 locations across 40 countries.
Alastair McQueen, ZF Group Vice President, Global Systems Engineering Electric Power Steering, said: “We are delighted that Apleona has been able to respond quickly to support to ZF’s requirements here in Solihull. We are also very happy that the employees of the former service provider working on this site have been retained by Apleona, maintaining jobs and allowing a seamless transition between suppliers.”
James Thoden van Velzen, Apleona UK and Ireland Chief Executive Officer, said: “We are delighted to have secured this deal with a world leading organisation such as ZF and in the process, have directly safeguarded 26 jobs. I am proud that we were able to quickly respond and grasp the immediate needs of the site and to fulfil all the requirements of the client.”
- ENDS –
Notes to editors:
Apleona HSG Facility Management UK, part of the global Apleona Group, provides integrated facility management solutions in UK and Ireland. With a client base that extends across 250 UK and Ireland operational sites, we employ 3000 talented people to deliver service solutions that work for our clients.
Our service solution is tailored to deliver building and facilities management and workplace services through a model that operates through self-delivery. We provide all none core business services from cleaning through to building maintenance for private and public sectors organisations including shopping centres, universities, hospitals and offices.


 
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